Don’t Get Me Wrong…

Don’t get me wrong… We commonly encounter that phrase (or sentence) when reading blog posts on the web.

For example, “Cats are fabulous pets. Don’t get me wrong… dogs are adorable.”

I’ll admit I even used “Don’t get me wrong…” in my writing. But what does it exactly mean?

It could mean, “Please don’t misinterpret what I have to say…”

or maybe:

“What I’m about to tell you will most likely piss you off, but I don’t want
you to hate me for it that’s why I’m putting on a disclaimer: Don’t get me wrong.”

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It’s been a year since I started blogging…

anniversary

I was just visiting my blog a while ago when I was surprised from that notification I received from wordpress.

It’s been a year….

When I first started blogging my writing wasn’t that good. I didn’t even expected that I’ll be writing a lot of posts.

But then something happened. I started to like writing….

I remembered back then I was dreaming on becoming a real writer. You know, those people that who writes books and articles.

I bought a read a lot of books about writing, honing my skills along the way by writing posts in this blog.

Back then I was writing daily. Yes daily.

I never wanted to miss a day that when I can’t write a full post I’ll just write one of those short quotes.

Ah those were the days.

So what happened? Why did I lay low in writing posts?

I’ll answer.

As I can remember I missed a day of writing a single post. I tried to make up for it by writing some more, but in my mind it’s already alright to miss a day of writing a post. Also, I wanted a break from daily writing back then.

Fast-forward for a few more months and here I am writing a blog post again. I decided that since it’s my blog’s anniversary then I shouldn’t miss the opportunity to write a post.

And oh, since I like learning new stuff. I learned this new acronym tl;dr (or TLDR) which stands for…

Too Long Didn’t Read

Whitebeltblogger is celebrating his blog’s anniversary by reminiscing the past.

Thanks for reading (even if it’s only the TLDR)!

🙂

 

Technology Has Changed… Self-Help Advice Should Follow

If you’re familiar with old school self-help authors (90s and earlier) you’ll hear the usual (and overused) advice, ‘Read books.’ Being an avid book reader I actually support that kind of advice.

But times have changed. Besides books there are lots of learning materials out there. Blogs, youtube videos, podcasts, online courses, etc. We’re not limited to reading books anymore.

If you’re a child of the internet like me, you probably already know all of those stuff and more. So why I am stating the obvious you may ask?

The reason is I want to change the belief that a person can only get quality learning through books. Other mediums are just as effective (or more).

For example, I learn better technical materials watching video tutorials compared to books. While some people like to learn from podcasts while driving or commuting. To each to his own.

So the next time someone asks, “How many books have you read this year?” or “What book are you currently reading?” You can answer with, “I just watched this awesome video on making ice-cream last week,” or “I listened to Engineer Bob’s podcast yesterday.”

That person might give you a weird look, but what’s important is you have learned something, the mode of teaching is a lot less relevant.

Blogging has benefited me, really…

Here I am writing a post again. I haven’t blog for quite a while. But in spite of that I’m still grateful I tried blogging even just for a short while (a few months) last year.

Firstly, it improved my writing skills (as well as grammar). Before blogging I haven’t identified myself as writer. Blogging is writing.

Secondly, it gave me blogging experience. I wrote over 100 posts (although some of them are just short quotes). If ever I’m gonna start blogging again I can be confident that I can deliver.

And lastly, I never thought of this before, but the posts that I have written gives a glimpse on how I used to think. What I’ve written so far are my views, values, and ideas on those times.

I may change my outlook completely, but I can always look back on how things used to be.

Those things said, I’ll wrap this short post. Thank you for reading 🙂

 

 

Your Writing Is the Bridge — Your Message Is the Goods

Writers, and bloggers alike, sometimes argue whether a writer’s skill is more important than the message itself (content) or vice versa.

Which is more important?

The best answer is that both of them are important.

Writing skill gives you credibility and the ability to communicate your message clearly, precisely, and concisely.

Your message, on the other hand, is what the reader will remember long after they have forgotten the exact words you used to communicate your message.

Writers may favor one over the other and that’s all right. The important thing is not to become obsessed with one aspect and totally ignore the other.

The bridge and goods metaphor

If your writing skill is the bridge, your message is the goods.

In a sense, the goods are more important, but without the bridge the goods won’t be delivered to their recipient, which is the reader. Aside from that, the bridge also needs to be strong, so heavy goods can be transported through it.

Furthermore, no matter how strong the bridge is, if the goods are incomplete, spoiled, or broken, then the recipient won’t be happy. In short, the goods must be good.
 
 
Grammar Note:
In writing this post, I was pondering whether to use “… Your Message Is the Goods” or “… Your Message Are the Goods.” Fortunately, I found the answer in this page.

Just Do It

A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.

—Richard Bach


As I wrote fewer posts every week in my blog, I’ve noticed some changes in myself.

My whining — I mean observations

First, I was no longer thinking myself as a writer. Sure, I still write every day in the form of emails, blog comments, text messages, etc., but writing a blog post feels a lot different.

Second, although my life conditions was the same now as when I was writing every day, I feel less happy. In my own reflection, the closest reason that I came up is that writing itself is an act of creation, and we humans feel happy when we create something.

That said, when the act of creation is halted, it feels like some of our powers have been taken away from us. In this case, though, I’m the one who voluntarily gave that power away.

And lastly, writing words are more difficult (but not as hard as before I started writing/blogging). Now, I understand the popular advice on writers that one must write every day. Writing, like any skill needs to be practiced so that the writer will stay sharp.

The solution

The solution is easy. Like the title of the posts says, “I’ll just do it.” Meaning I’ll try to write every day again… being interrupted by….

Do or do not… there is no try.

—Yoda (the green Jedi master from Stars Wars)


OK… I’ll stop trying — I will do it.

I’m feeling pumped again….

I’m a writer. I feel happy. And, oh boy I’ve written a blog post again. You’re awesome reader.

White Belt Blogger Is Back

The Journey Continues

Yes, I’m back. Although only few days have passed since my last post, I’m glad to be back.

Why all the excitement?

I’ve been known to blog daily in the past. Not that I won’t blog again for consecutive days, after more than two months of daily blogging, I found it unsustainable.

Well I can really force myself to blog daily no matter what, but I realized that it’s not going help my blogging in the long run.

In the past, I’ve written twin posts regarding blogging and not blogging every day. In this post I’m going to give my comments on what I written back then.

Comments on the blogging every day post

Because only a few bloggers do it, posting every day will make your blog stand out. Some of the most popular sites/blogs on the internet gives it readers fresh content every day, even if the content was written by a guest blogger.

Yep, only a few bloggers do it (I was once of them), and I admire their efforts. The thing to note about the big sites, though, is their posts are written by multiple writers or guest bloggers, so there’s no need to worry if you can’t match their output.

People read blogs on the internet either to be informed or to be entertained, or both; so give them what they want.

I agree that we should write to give service to our readers, but do you really think that your blog is the only one they read on the internet? Most probably not. So, take it lightly, most of your readers will understand if you won’t be able to post daily.

Blogging is a form of writing. That said, blogging every day improves your writing skills. However, to improve your writing, you need to learn more about the craft as well (e.g., read blogs about writing).

Yes, blogging every day will definitely improve your writing skill, but so does blogging regularly, although not a daily basis.

Having the desire to write even a short post every day, develops your self-discipline. Self-discipline leads to a higher self-esteem.

Hmmm. To think of it, my self-esteem hasn’t dropped when I stopped blogging daily. But here I am blogging, probably to maintain my self-esteem.

Before you write something, you need to think of something to write first. That being the case, blogging every day develops your creativity and thinking skills, which are invaluable in daily living.

In my experience, blogging every day improved my thinking skills. On the contrary, we can think of things to blog about without writing them at the same day; thus, providing more time for research and idea enhancement.

Comments on the not blogging everyday post

When blogging ever day, there is a possibility that you may experience burn-out and in-turn associate blogging with discomfort. That said, write posts less often when you start seeing signs of burn-out (e.g., fatigue, irritation, etc.).

Yeah, I did experience it, albeit slightly. I didn’t know that I’ll be following my own advice not long after.

If you don’t blog every day, it will not become a commonplace activity — and you’ll feel more excitement when you’re about to write a post.

It depends on the individual. On my side, though, blogging every day hasn’t decreased, in any way, the fulfillment I get after I click the publish button.

If you blog every day, there’s a chance that your readers will only be able to read your latest post. Most people don’t live on the internet, and also, there are other blogs out there that they also enjoy reading.

Similar to what I mentioned above. In my experience, however, readers still read my previous (but not so old) posts.

There are days when you might not be able to think of an idea for a blog post. In those days, you may take a break if you want, instead of feeling frustrated.

You won’t really run-out of ideas, they’re everywhere, but the question is whether your idea is already ripe enough or still needs some refinement through further research and thinking.

Blogging every day won’t really improve your writing skills, unless you make an effort to do so. That is, practicing with the goal of improving your skills. It’s called deliberate practice, by the way.

I still agree with this point. If you were new to writing, like I was before, blogging every day will greatly improve your writing skill. But there will come a time that you’ll feel your skill has plateaued. The solution: try something new.

So what now?

That said, I’ll still write post when I can. It might be on consecutive days, or it might be not — what I want now is flexibility. I haven’t mentioned yet that realizing I have the option not to blog every day made be happier person.

Before, there were days that I was forcing myself to blog even though I haven’t slept enough. I’m not saying that we should avoid challenging experience like that, after all it develops mental toughness.

Knowing that blogging every day is only an option, and not an absolute rule that might be followed rigidly makes me feel better. I feel like a white belt blogger again. 🙂