When Reading Becomes a Form of Procrastination

Procrastination

I like to read, and I do it a lot. I read books, ebooks, and blogs. Recently, I asked myself a question. When does reading become another form of procrastination?

Some fluff (you can skip to next section if you want)


I heard someone saying, “How can reading be a form of procrastination? Reading is a worthwhile activity. It’s much better than watching TV and playing video games.”

I understand what you’re saying pal.

Teachers tell us to read. Self-help gurus also tell us to read. Even celebrities that don’t read but want to look good tell us to read.

“So, how come you said that reading is a form of procrastination?”

Life isn’t all about reading you know. Students go to school. Employees go to work. Parents take care of their kids. Animals eat or are eaten. Trees, well … grow.

Oh shoot! Am I rambling again? This post is starting to sound (or read) like those fluffy blogs that I don’t want to read even if someone pays me to read them.

It’s time to switch to no B.S. blogging mode.

When does reading become a form of procrastination? (Straight no B.S. answer.)


Procrastination is when we’re not doing what we’re supposed (or want) to do; we can be procrastinating without being idle, for example, when we do a lighter activity (such as reading) to substitute for a more difficult activity (such as [insert difficult activity here]).

Are you reading instead of writing blog posts? … yes? Then you’re procrastinating.

Are you reading instead of jogging outside? … yes? Then you’re procrastinating.

Are you reading instead of spending time with your kids? … yes? Then you’re also procrastinating.

5 step solution

  1. Realize that life isn’t all about reading.
  2. Limit your daily reading time (for example, two hours.)
  3. Read only what is necessary (or what you can’t resist).
  4. Make a todo list, including the task that you’re supposed to do.
  5. When the time comes to do the dreaded task — just do it.

Easy, isn’t it?

Blogger’s note


Writing can be a therapeutic tool (gosh, it sounds like that I need therapy). At first, I wasn’t sure if I’ll publish this post. It was supposed to serve as a reminder for myself; just in case I read too much again, ignoring other tasks.

But since other people may find it useful, even if it’s only one person (who knows it might be you), I decided to publish it publicly.

Photo credit: Danielle Scott from Flickr.

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